greg voth,  illustration & fine art                                                             bio

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about the artist


Background: After acquiring a degree in architecture at VPI & SU and working briefly in the field, I refocused my career toward graphic design. I’ve worked as both a graphic designer and illustrator since the late 1970’s.  Over the years, I’ve illustrated magazines and book covers, album and CD covers and created art and design work for advertising.

As an artist, I’ve been fortunate to be chosen as a judge for a
Society of Illustrators competition.  My work has also been selected for inclusion in shows there.  I received a partial scholarship to attend the 3rd Illustrators Workshop in 1979, where I studied with the top illustrators of our time. An article showcasing my work and drawing technique appeared in the American Artist, November, 1996, issue.


In the fine art realm, I’ve was recently selected for inclusion in the group show, “Introducing the Heights,” at The Distillery Gallery and Artist Space, Jersey City, NJ.


My wife, Robin, and I live in Jersey City, NJ. Robin, formerly Robin McAllister, works as a prop. Our dog, Lucky, has been with us for a dozen years now. Our cats liked him... well, one of them did.


my vision therapy


On a personal note, I underwent vision therapy 6 years ago to correct  my strabismus. I’ve had a ‘lazy eye’ all my life, much like Rembrandt. A high number of artists in our society suffer vision issues, according to recent studies. This condition has never affected my graphic work, after all, I did get a degree in Architecture and worked as an illustrator prior to creating film and tv graphics.


I never had depth perception. didn’t see in stereo with both eyes teaming properly and 3-D movies were just noise with or without the glasses. It’s no wonder a higher percentage of artists have eye issues, art is often what kids gravitate to when they find they can’t participate in team related activities or read easily.


The critical period for binocular development is thought to be between the first three and eight months of life. Simply put, if a child doesn’t attain stereopsis by the age of two, they’ll never get it. I was told, ‘You’ll never have it, you’ll never miss what you’ve never had - just go on with your life.’ It’s been long thought and too often taught that the adult brain isn’t ‘plastic’ enough to adapt to stereopsis. Ironically, the three sisters in my wife’s family all married strabismic men. What a lousy sports team we would have made!


After reading ‘Fixing My Gaze: A Scientist's Journey Into Seeing in Three Dimensions’ by Susan Barry, I located my wonderful vision therapist Leonard Press, FCOVD, FAAO (FamilyEye Associates, P.C. in Fair Lawn, NJ) and began a program of 64 sessions with 10 progress evaluations over 8 months. I completed my sessions and achieved my goal of seeing in 3D nearly 6 years ago and now see with stereopsis for extended periods - 12 hours straight is my personal record to date. To quote my first therapist, ‘Leaps and bounds Greg, leaps and bounds!’ (thanks Dr. Brennan!). Another of my wonderful therapists at Family EyeCare was Jennifer Ehrentraut, who is now a friend.


I heartily recommend that anyone with vision issues consider vision therapy. It’s been the single most rewarding thing I’ve done for my adult self, apart from meeting Robin and adopting our Lucky dog.

 

photo credit ©Zoe Gemelli 2010

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